Renting a mobile home

Most mobile home residents buy their own park homes or caravans. However, it is possible to rent a mobile home on a site.

How do I find a mobile home to rent?

Most caravans, motorhomes and park homes are only available to rent for holidays. However, some residential parks do offer properties to rent on a more permanent basis.

You can search for mobile homes to rent at UK Parks.

Many mobile home occupiers rent caravans through their family or friends. However, be aware that if you are renting a caravan on someone’s land and they don’t have permission and a site licence, you will have very few rights and can be evicted easily.

How much rent will I have to pay?

Mobile home rents should be cheaper than traditional properties. However, there are no controls over rent for mobile homes, so you will need to negotiate with the landlord.

You will probably also have to pay pitch fees and service charges to whoever owns the site that the mobile home is on.

Can I claim Housing Benefit?

Yes. Housing Benefit can help you pay your rent or pitch fees if you are on a low income. For more information click here.

What are my rights if I rent a mobile home?

If you rent a mobile home, your rights will be set out in the law and in the agreement you have with your landlord,. This will either be a written or a verbal agreement. To find out what your rights might be see our page on mobile home tenancies.

For advice if you are being evicted from a mobile home, click here.

We are sorry that we cannot provide this information in Welsh, however if you would like to speak to an adviser in Welsh please contact 0345 075 5005.

Phone an adviser

If you have a housing problem, call our expert housing advice helpline
0345 075 5005

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If you have a non-urgent problem and would like to speak to an advisor
email us

This page was last updated on: August 1, 2018

Shelter Cymru acknowledges the support of Shelter in allowing us to adapt their content. The information contained on this site is updated and maintained by Shelter Cymru and only gives general guidance on the law in Wales. It should not be regarded or relied upon as a complete or authoritative statement of the law.