Renting a mobile home : what rights do I have?

If you rent a mobile home you need to know what kind of tenancy you have so that you can understand your rights to live in it.

Remember, your tenancy will only determine your rights to live in the rented mobile home itself, NOT your rights to live on the mobile home / caravan site.  Your rights to live on the site are regulated by different laws, and depend on whether or not you live on a protected site or an unprotected site. Click here for more details.

If you are not sure what kind of tenancy you have after reading this information, get advice.

Mobile home renting agreements

If you rent a mobile home, your rights will come from the law and from the agreement you have with your landlord. This can be a written agreement or it can be an agreement made verbally.

The agreement you have might be a tenancy or a licence. Most people who rent a mobile home have a licence, but you have stronger rights if you have tenancy. If you have a licence you have limited rights, particularly if your landlord wants to evict you.

Do I have a tenancy?

You may have a tenancy if you rent a mobile home that can be classed as a ‘dwelling house’.

Your mobile home may be classed as a ‘dwelling house’ if it:

  • has mains supplies of electricity, water and telephone, and
  • is used as a permanent residence, and
  • is static and cannot be moved, or
  • is so large that it cannot be moved in one piece.

If you have a tenancy, it will be either an assured, assured shorthold or regulated tenancy.

Regulated tenancies
You may have a regulated tenancy if:

  • your mobile home can be classed as a dwelling house, and
  • your tenancy agreement began before 15 January 1989.

As a regulated tenant, you may be able to apply to the rent officer to have a fair rent determined and you will have more rights against being evicted. Read more about regulated tenancies here.

Assured or assured shorthold tenancies
You may be an assured or assured shorthold tenant if:

  • your mobile home can be classed as a dwelling house, and
  • your tenancy began after 15 January 1989.

Assured tenants in particular have stronger tenancy rights. See the sections on assured and assured shorthold tenancies to read about your rights.

Problems with tenancy status

Your landlord may refuse to accept that you are a tenant.

You may need to take court action if you want to assert your rights as a tenant. This may happen if:

  • you are defending an eviction after your landlord asks you to leave
  • your landlord refuses to make repairs to your home

It’s always best to get advice before taking any action.

Phone an adviser

If you have a housing problem, call our expert housing advice helpline
0345 075 5005

Email an adviser

If you have a non-urgent problem and would like to speak to an advisor
email us

We are sorry that we cannot provide this information in Welsh, however if you would like to speak to an adviser in Welsh please contact 0345 075 5005.

This page was last updated on: August 1, 2018

Shelter Cymru acknowledges the support of Shelter in allowing us to adapt their content. The information contained on this site is updated and maintained by Shelter Cymru and only gives general guidance on the law in Wales. It should not be regarded or relied upon as a complete or authoritative statement of the law.